Copenhagen Phil in danger – online petition

The current Danish Minister for Culture, Mette Bock, recently wrote a feature article in the Jyllands-Posten (Jutland Post) which suggested that Copenhagen Phil- Zealand region’s symphony orchestra be closed down. At the same time, politician Alex Ahrendtsen from the Danish People’s Party also proposed plans to close down the orchestra.

Copenhagen Phil needs your support!

The Danish Culture Minister aims to strengthen the Danish orchestra landscape.. however closing Copenhagen Phil seems to be the least constructive way to achieve this. According to Politiken newspaper, “..of the 5 Danish regional orchestras, Copenhagen Phil has been the most proactive in re-thinking the idea of what a symphony orchestra can contribute with new concert partnerships, pop-up concerts in the metro, and a strong working relationship with private businesses. Copenhagen Phil is an innovative center for the presentation of music for a growing and diverse audience in the whole region”.

Copenhagen Phil is the island of Zealand’s symphony orchestra and it plays for just as many audiences in Copenhagen as in the rest of Zealand. The orchestra is Zealand region’s local sympony orchestra, which regularly meets residents from all over Zealand and in the concert hall in Copenhagen. If the orchestra is closed, one entire region in Denmark will not have a symphony orchestra- a region with 2.6 million inhabitants and with the largest land area. How is it possible that Zealand may no longer have it’s own regional orchestra?

Help the orchestras  fight to save an innovative and modern symphony orchestra, which works in and for all of Zealand, including Copenhagen.

Sign the petition here!

Please note that you have to confirm your signature in the confirmation e-mail.

Upcoming International Conferences

The arts and orchestra conferences circus is taking speed again in 2017.

International Orchestra Conference

The IAMA (International Artist Managers Association) 27th International Conference takes place in the Paris Philharmony from April 5 to 7.

Find more information on this event here.

The international orchestra community will meet in Montreal (Canada) for the 4th FIM International Orchestra Conference from May 11 to 14. Experts from orchestras around the globe will discuss topic issues and developments in the  orchestra sector.

More information

The latest edition of the Classical:NEXT Fair takes place in Rotterdam (Netherlands) from May 17 to 20.

More information

Time marches on. Make you conference choice!

@ClassicalNEXT 2017 Programme Announced

Classical:NEXT 2017, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 17 – 20 May 2017, has announced the programme and further details.

Classical:NEXT

Classical:NEXT

Showcase artists (including the launch of the new public festival!), Conference sessions, Project Pitches and Innovation Award nominees, plus news in brief from around the classical world in our Worldwide Community News. You can also see which delegates and companies will be coming to Classical:NEXT 2017.

Wallace Foundation offers #arts #management tools for free

The US based Wallace Foundation offers several arts management tools, which give access to a series of studies describing strategies of arts organizations that sought to build their audiences.

wallace_foundation

 

Find more information in the Knowledge Center. This is really useful stuff.

 

@ClassicalNEXT 2017, 17 – 20 May – Registration & Booking is open

You can now register to attend Classical:NEXT 2017 –  classical music’s most important industry event! Booking a stand in the Expo is also possible now: Visit the registration section of the website to see more information.

Classical:NEXT

Classical:NEXT

Classical:NEXT will return to de Doelen, Rotterdam, the Netherlands to host its sixth edition, which will be held 17 – 20 May 2017. Keep your eyes out: the very first programme elements for Classical:NEXT 2017 will be announced on 30 November. For the third year in a row, registration prices remain exactly the same. The earlier one registers the better . One can register before 13 January for the very best prices, and before 3 March to make sure to be included in the Classical:NEXT Guide.

It is possible to register now via the website. Registration only takes a few minutes. One can use last year’s registration data. Participantb will join professionals from all round the globe – delegations and umbrella stands from the countries listed below are already confirmed, and more stands and delegations from all over the globe will follow in the coming weeks and months.

  • Australia (Sounds Australia)
  • Belgium (Flanders Arts Institute & Wallonia / Brussels Music)
  • Canada (Canada Council for the Arts)
  • Denmark (Danish Arts Foundation)
  • Estonia (Music Estonia & Estonian Music Information Centre)
  • Finland (Music Finland)
  • France (Business France)
  • Latvia (Latvia/Letland)
  • Lithuania (Music Lithuania)
  • Luxembourg (music:LX)
  • Spain – Catalonia (Creative Catalonia)
  • Sweden (Export Music Sweden)
  • Switzerland (Fondation Suisa)
  • The Netherlands (Dutch Pavilion)
  • UK (British Music Stand / BPI)
  • UK – Scotland (Creative Scotland)

US Orchestras loose subscribers and audiences

The League of American Orchestras has released Orchestra Facts: 2006-2014, the organization’s first comprehensive longitudinal study of American orchestra finances and operations.

Survey says: US orchestras loose subscribers and audienees

Survey says: US orchestras loose subscribers and audienees

Using an extensive variety of organizational and external data sources, the study depicts the enormous breadth and scope of the American orchestra field, along with the complexities and resiliencies inherent in the art form’s business model. With its focus on the nine-year period from 2006 to 2014, including topline trends, five-year trends, and one-year snapshots, Orchestra Facts examines the effects of the recent recession, as well as broader trends around audience attendance, orchestra finances, and accessibility.

Orchestra Facts: 2006-2014 reveals a remarkable breadth of activity and commitment of resources on the part of orchestras in service to their communities,” said League of American Orchestras President and CEO Jesse Rosen. “Our first-ever longitudinal study provides an authoritative fact base for analyzing orchestras’ finances and operations, as well as new metrics for understanding orchestras’ education and community engagement activity.” The report finds that the scope and scale of the orchestra field in the United States is vast: in 2014, 1,224 orchestras contributed $1.8 billion to the U.S. economy and attracted a total audience of nearly 25 million. Two out of every three orchestras operated with annual expenses budgets of under $300,000. Cost barriers traditionally associated with attending orchestra performances are coming down: the number of free concerts has increased, while the cost of purchasing paid-for tickets fell.

 

An 18% growth in the number of households subscribing shows that demand for subscriptions is still growing, even if spend per subscriber is down. Overall, audiences declined by 10.5% between 2010 and 2014, broadly in line with other performing arts sectors. However, audiences for classical series concerts declined by 5.5% (corresponding roughly to a 3% decline in the number of classical series performances offered). The report also finds that orchestras’ work continues outside the concert hall through a wide array of education and community engagement activities for diverse audiences.

Generally, the report confirms recession recovery for the field as a whole, but individual orchestras may have different experiences. The study also illustrates the complexity of the orchestra business model as orchestras balance multiple forms of earned, contributed, and investment revenue. Looking at Change in Unrestricted Net Assets (CUNA), defined as the difference between unrestricted income and total expenses, the proportion of orchestras reporting deficits dropped from 40% in 2010 to 18% in 2014.

 Report Highlights*:

See report’s Key Findings (pp 4-5) and Conclusions (p 20) sections for more details.

Download the Full Report Here

 

For the first time, this report publicly reveals a detailed picture of the scope and scale of the orchestra field in the United States:

  • In 2014, the orchestra field contributed $1.8 billion to the U.S. economy and attracted a total audience of nearly 25 million.
  • That same year, there were 1,224 U.S. orchestras, distributed widely across all 50 states, and two out of every three orchestras operated with annual expenses budgets of under $300,000.

Orchestras perform, but also teach, lead, facilitate, and train.

  • Their work drives a vast array of education and community engagement (EdCE) activities.
  • A segment of the report analyzes survey responses from 98 orchestras EdCE activities: these 98 orchestras alone reported 19,000 EdCE performances, musical activities, and events, with 2.1 million people participating in these EdCE events.
  • Two thirds participated without charge.
  • Thirty-eight percent of the EdCE participants were African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American/Pacific Islander, or American Indian/Alaskan Native. Sixty-two percent were white.

Cost barriers traditionally associated with attending orchestra performances are coming down:

  • Between 2010 and 2014, the number of free concerts increased, while the cost of purchasing paid-for tickets fell.

Orchestras find themselves at a moment of transition:

  • 2013 saw a significant shift in the traditional orchestra business model as – for the first time – income produced by single ticket and group sales was higher than that earned from subscription revenues.
  • The subscription model remains important: an 18% growth in the number of households subscribing shows that demand for subscriptions is still growing, even if spend per subscriber is down.
  • Overall, audiences declined by 10.5% between 2010 and 2014, broadly in line with other performing arts sectors.
  • However, audiences for classical series concerts declined by 5.5%, corresponding roughly to a 3% decline in the number of classical series performances offered.
  • The stability of contributed income through the recession years and the large number of small gifts made to orchestras (around 75% of the gifts made by non-trustee individuals were under $250) indicate a broad base of continuing community support for – and appreciation of – orchestras’ work.

The orchestra business model is complex but resilient:

  • Orchestras depend upon a complex portfolio of revenue sources that includes multiple forms of earned, contributed, and investment income.
  • Orchestras successfully maintained contributed income levels through the recession while containing growth in expenses.
  • Many orchestras rely on investment income, though this makes them more vulnerable during leaner times.
  • Between 2006 and 2014, total asset value increased by 4% while liabilities decreased by 7.5%, having peaked at the recession’s height. Consequently, net assets grew at a rate exceeding inflation by 6.6%.
  • In general terms, these measures indicate improved organizational stability over time, despite the impact of recession on the field.
  • Looking at Change in Unrestricted Net Assets (CUNA), defined as the difference between unrestricted income and total expenses, the proportion of orchestras reporting deficits dropped from 40% in 2010 to 18% in 2014.
  • It’s important to note that the report confirms recession recovery for the whole field; individual orchestras may have different experiences.

Orchestra Field-wide 2014 Snapshot: 1,224 orchestras in the NCAR and OSR data sets for financial year 2013-14

Orchestra Field 2006-14, 9-year Trends: The 547 orchestras with annual expenses of $50,000 or more that submitted data each of the five financial years from 2005-06 to 2013-14

The OSR data set was also exclusively analyzed in the following two ways: OSR2014 Snapshot: The 107 League member orchestras participating in the Orchestra Statistical Report for financial year 2013-14;  OSR 2010-14, 5-year Trends: The 65 League member orchestras participating in the Orchestra Statistical Report for each of the five financial years from 2009-10 to 2013-14

Figures in the report are adjusted for inflation.

Orchestras surveyed include both professional and semi-professional orchestras, but do not include school, college, or military orchestras.

Youth orchestras are partially represented in the data sets, and are identified by footnotes throughout the report.

Read the full press release here.

@ClassicalNEXT: Open Call for Proposals for 2017 Edition

The leading classical music meeting and worldwide innovators’ network Classical:NEXT has opened its annual call for proposals. All classical music professionals from around the globe can submit their suggestions for showcase artists, project pitches and conference sessions to be hosted at Classical:NEXT in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 17-20 May 2017.

Classical:NEXT

Classical:NEXT

As every year, Classical:NEXT is calling for outstanding artists, projects, future-oriented topics and interactive conference formats from all corners of the classical music world, whether that be early or contemporary, traditional or experimental. Proposals can be made in four categories: Showcases, nighttime Club Showcases, Conference Sessions of various, preferably interactive formats and Project Pitches. Classical:NEXT offers a dedicated online proposal site, to submit the proposals. All proposals will be considered by an independent jury of international experts.

Deadline to submit proposals is Friday, 30 September 2016.

Increase of Proposals Expected

Organisers Piranha Arts and de Doelen are expecting an increase in proposals due to the success and increased outreach of the meeting’s last edition. Classical:NEXT Director Jennifer Dautermann:
“As awareness of and participation in Classical:NEXT grows, we expect the already outstanding quality as well as substantial quantity of proposals to increase. Our jury have their hands full each year. We hope those hands will be filled to overflowing when this year’s Call for Proposals phase closes.”

1,200 international classical music professionals visited Classical:NEXT for its fifth edition in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, this May. One of the reasons for this success is the acclaimed and well-attended conference featuring interactive sessions, debates and project pitches as well as the Showcases, enabling new talent, new formats and unorthodox approaches to reach out to the international market.

 

Programme Selected from Proposals – This is How it Works!

To offer this exceptional programme, Classical:NEXT works with a proposal system “by the community, for the community”: Experts and everyday innovators from all sectors of the scene are invited to submit their proposals for the showcases and the conference, regardless of whether they have attended Classical:NEXT before or not, as Jennifer Dautermann explains: “We are looking for the outstandingly innovative, the bearers of ‘wow!’ moments, the eye-openers the and horizon-broadeners. We seek the best and brightest on the trail of innovation and excellence. Community – this is your call! The ball is in your court!”

From the hundreds of proposals submitted by 30 September 2016, an international jury of experts from all fields of the scene will assemble a handpicked selection of artists, speakers and projects – guaranteeing a neutral and balanced selection of only the best showcases and most pressing conference topics for Classical:NEXT 2017.