@DetroitSymphony launches “Classroom” webpage – resource for teachers and students

With the support of a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) grant, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) has created DSO Classroom, a new online hub for students, teachers, and schools at dso.org/classroom.

DSO Classroom features music curriculum guides for educators as well as on-demand video access to DSO educational concerts, artist interviews, behind-the-scenes content, and more. Meant to be an easy-to-use resource, the page unifies the content of several previous pages under the umbrella of the Wu Family Academy of Learning and Engagement, the DSO’s education wing.

Visitors can also use DSO Classroom to register for free Live from Orchestra Hall: Classroom Edition webcasts, get information about joining the DSO’s Civic Youth Ensembles, and learn more about upcoming Wu Family Academy programming.

The DSO worked with Troy, MI-based Media Genesis, a longtime web partner, to create the new pages, and used video-platform services designed by Brightcove, Inc.

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@OrchLeague National Conference in #Detroit – Watch opening in livestream June 6, 4pm ET

Livestream

Opening Plenary

League of American Orchestras; 72nd National Conference

from the

Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 4:00pm-5:30pm Eastern

Detroit Rising: Stories of Renewal

Home of DSO downtown Detroit

 

Economics, race, immigration, urban versus suburban, arts and culture, and of course transportation – this being the Motor City – all converge in a story about transformation and how to lead in the face of tremendous adversity.

Watch and listen to the Opening Plenary of the League’s 2017 Conference as civic, business, and cultural leaders reveal the powerful interplay of their paths and how they’ve become change agents in building a new Detroit for all.

 

Welcome Speakers

Mark Davidoff, board chairman, Detroit Symphony Orchestra

Anne Parsons, president and CEO, Detroit Symphony Orchestra

Jesse Rosen, president and CEO, League of American Orchestras

Patricia Richards, board chair, League of American Orchestras

Welcome from Ford Motor Company

James G. Vella, president, Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services

Gold Baton Award Presentation

Ann Hobson Pilot, former principal harp of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, will receive the League’s 2017 Gold Baton Award, the League of American Orchestras’ highest honor, given annually for distinguished service to America’s orchestras.

Panel Discussion, Detroit Rising: Stories of Renewal

Matt Cullen, principal, Rock Ventures LLC; CEO, JACK Entertainment LLC

Hassan Jaber, executive director, Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS)

Mariam Noland, president, Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan

Shirley Stancato, president and CEO, New Detroit

Moderator: Mark Stryker, arts reporter and music critic, Detroit Free Press (1995-2016)

 

Watch live at 4PM ET, Tuesday, June 6.

US #Orchestras to Examine their Role in a Changing Public Policy Landscape

League of American Orchestras’ 2017 National Conference, June 6-8 in Detroit: Celebration of League’s 75th Anniversary

The League of American Orchestras’ 2017 National Conference in Detroit, June 6-8, will focus on the ways forward for orchestras in an uncertain public policy landscape. Using the story of Detroit’s revitalization and resurgent creative community as a backdrop, the Conference will include a diverse array of civic, business, and cultural voices, including many from the Motor City.

Detroit Symphony Hall

Detroit Symphony Orchestra is host of the 2017 Conference

Nearly 1,000 orchestra constituents from across the country – managers and staff, musicians, trustees, and volunteers – are expected to attend the Conference, taking place at the Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center and at the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center, home to Conference host Detroit Symphony Orchestra and Music Director Leonard Slatkin. This is the third League Conference in Detroit; it was held there previously in 1964 and 1986.

The 2017 National Conference will include live performances, social and networking events, and an assortment of sessions highlighting diversity, artistic innovation, fundraising, audience development, technology, financial sustainability, and more, including a special behind-the-scenes look at the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s groundbreaking live video webcasts.

“As we celebrate our 75th anniversary, we find one of the League’s core mandates – that together we are stronger than individually – more prescient than ever,” said Jesse Rosen, president and CEO, League of American Orchestras. “At the Conference, we will hear from diverse voices, using the city of Detroit’s remarkable transformation as a symbol of what we can accomplish together, through effective partnerships, advocacy, and innovative practice.”

“The Detroit Symphony Orchestra is thrilled to be the host orchestra for this year’s League of American Orchestras’ Conference,” said Anne Parsons, president and CEO of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. “Our resurgent city that we are so proud to call home is sure to surprise and delight the Conference delegation. We know everyone will come away inspired and enriched by the content of the meetings and as well as their experiences in the great city of Detroit.

The Conference Opening Plenary kicks off at Orchestra Hall on June 6 with Detroit Rising: Stories of Renewal, a panel discussion of how economics, race, immigration, urban versus suburban, arts and culture, and transportation converge in a story about transformation and how to lead in the face of tremendous adversity. Ann Hobson Pilot, former principal harpist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, will receive the League’s highest honor, The Gold Baton. She will also perform.

On June 7, the Luncheon and Annual Meeting will celebrate the official launch of the League’s 75th anniversary and League Giving Day, a new one-day fundraising campaign. Five musicians and their orchestras will receive the Ford Musician Awards for Excellence in Community Service, and The Annie Moses Band will be featured in a special showcase performance.

The Closing Plenary and Luncheon on June 8 will feature national thought leaders Melanca Clark, president, the Hudson Webber Foundation; Maria Rosario Jackson, member, National Council on the Arts, senior advisor to the arts and culture program, the Kresge Foundation; Rip Rapson, president and CEO, the Kresge Foundation; and Steven J. Tepper, dean, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, Arizona State University will discuss Pathways Forward as they examine the role of arts and culture in these uncertain times.

Conference delegates will enjoy a variety of events, including an evening performance at Orchestra Hall on June 6 by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Leonard Slatkin, of Mohammed Fairouz’s Pax universalis, Kurt Weill’s Seven Deadly Sins, Sarah Kirkland Snider’s Something for the Dark, Michigan native Jonathan Bailey Holland’s Equality (text by Dr. Maya Angelou), and Mason Bates’ Warehouse Medicine. Detroit resident Shara Nova is the vocalist and Dr. Tonya Matthews the narrator. The concert will also feature a special performance by the Detroit Symphony Youth Orchestra. Immediately following the concert, the venue’s Atrium will be the site of an all-delegate Tune-Up Party; the next evening, on June 7, a social event for young professionals will also take place at the Atrium, followed by a DSO Mix @ The Max concert with Detroit’s Shigeto in the DSO’s flexible performance space The Cube. Conference attendees will also have the option of attending a Detroit Tigers game at Comerica Park on the evening of June 7.

The inspirational story of Detroit and its orchestra, as well as advocacy strategies for orchestras navigating the current public policy environment, will be woven into in a number of Conference sessions, including:

  • Opening Plenary
  • Closing Luncheon and Plenary
  • Mapping the DSO Journey
  • No Sound Barriers: Sphinx at 20
  • Changing Orchestra Culture: A Conversation with DSO Musicians
  • Make the Case Now!
  • Activating and Nurturing Community Alliances
  • Cultural Equity

Additional Conference Elective Sessions on June 7 and 8 will cover a range of topics including diversity and inclusion, community engagement, artistic programming, digital marketing, audience development, pricing, and philanthropy. Highlights include:

  • Bold and Informed: Researching Audiences on a Budget
  • Diversity and Inclusion in Action
  • Market Smarter: Insights and Strategy for Digital Marketing
  • The Strategic and Artistic Understanding of Pops
  • Classical Musicians of African Descent: Perspectives, Aspirations, and Outlook
  • Pricing: The Heart of the Matter
  • Socially-Conscious Musician-initiated Projects in Haiti and Seattle
  • Change Before You Have To (featuring the League’s Emerging Leaders Program Class of 2017 with lead faculty John McCann)
  • Musicians as Organizational Leaders
  • What is the Relevance of the Western Orchestral Canon in America Today?

Other Pre-Conference sessions include:

  • Foundations of Collective Bargaining
  • Leadership Seminar with Horst Abraham, faculty, Ross School of Business, Executive Education, University of Michigan
  • Education and Community Engagement Half-Day Meeting
  • Everyone is a Fundraiser: A Fundamentals-rich Application-robust Crash Course on Fundraising
  • Knowing Your Audience: A Step-by-Step Guide
  • 2017 Diversity Forum, the League’s third national convening of leaders from the field addressing major initiatives and topics, including a national diversity audition fund, national instrumentalist mentorship and audition training, field-wide board and staff diversity, and music education pathways.

For a full Conference schedule, including online registration, hotel accommodations, and travel discounts, visit http://americanorchestras.org/conference2017/

Read full press release here.

How selected #Orchestras integrate #digital tools

Orchestras around the globe are looking for pathways in the very fast changing digital environment. Only some orchestras can make money from media business, at least only, if they do it on their own behalf.

Home of Berlin Philharmonic and the DCH Ltd.

A good example is the Digital Concert Hall (DCH) of the Berlin Philharmonic. Find more information on this topic in this presentation, which has been hold at 4th International Orchestra Conference in Montreal on May 12, 2017:

Orchestras Integrating Digital Tools

Detroit Symphony Annual Giving Surpasses Goal At 17,4 Mio USD!

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) is back on the read of success – economically as well as artistically. DSO has surpassed its goal of $17 million for annual operational support with $17.4 million in individual, corporate and foundation gifts following the official close of the 2014 fiscal year on August 31, 2014. Individual giving, which saw an increase in every constituency, is owing to the generosity of 10,350 donors who represent the fourth consecutive year of donor base growth.

Home of DSO downtown Detroit

Home of DSO downtown Detroit

“Year after year we are humbled by the outpouring of support from this community,” said DSO President and CEO Anne Parsons. “The health of the DSO as an institution hinges on the generosity of others and thanks to the people of metro Detroit we are proudly on our way to a second consecutive balanced budget year.”

Individual giving increased from every constituency during fourth consecutive year of donor base growth

While overall individual giving grew by 8 percent, board giving grew by 10 percent for a total of $2.3 million. In its inaugural year, the Gabrilowitsch Society ($10,000+ giving club) secured more than 100 members giving a total of $3.3 million. The Governing Members, the DSO’s voting body, grew for the fourth consecutive year reaching 400 members. The Volunteer Council generated $200,000 in support through events and activities. With individual gifts ranging from $1 to $1 million, the median gift was $100.

DSO staff contributed to the Annual Fund with 100 percent participation in response to an anonymous $250,000 challenge grant. Likewise, DSO musicians contributed with an unprecedented leadership gift to the Heroes Gala honoring Dan Gilbert and Matt Cullen. Special events like the one-night-only performance with John Williams and Steven Spielberg, Heroes Gala and Classical Roots generated $1.2 million, a 35 percent increase over special events revenue from 2013.

The DSO is a community-supported orchestra, and strives to also be community supporting. In reciprocation for the support that makes programming possible at the Max M. Fisher Music Center, around metro Detroit and across the world through global webcasts, in FY 2014 DSO staff and musicians donated approximately 5,000 hours of service to the community through a company-wide Day of Service, in-kind event services and engagements at hospitals, schools, libraries and the like.

Multimedia: Topic trends for Orchestras on the internet

Social media – apps, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and many more – are no longer virgin soil for many orchestras and opera houses; or if they are, they will need to adapt, and fast.

 

Orchestras on the internet

Orchestras on the internet

 

These media will be key to keep old audiences and reach new ones, develop revenue streams and create powerful marketing opportunities. Digital Concert Hall of the Berlin Phil has been one of the most successful developments in this field (more than 600.000 “likes” on Facebook). But other orchestras are stepping forward, too. For example the Detroit Symphony claims itself with free webcasts as the “most accessible orchestra” in the world. At the same time, however, social media do have their pitfalls and follow their own rules that differ from print media or even Web 1.0 media. While aiming to convey spontaneity, they nonetheless require careful planning, and, as dialogic instruments, must be more than a platform to hand out information.

One has to look specifically at some cases of video trailers, from musicians’ home stories to sneak previews that whet viewers’ appetites for more. But caution: to be successful, media presentations have to be of solid quality – or risk ending up being well-meant rather than well-done. Some orchestras, such as the London Symphony Orchestra or the South Carolina Philharmonic, seem to be ahead in the game: often more relaxed and humorous, their tweets and Instagram posts present the ensembles as accessible and fun, successfully connecting with the mainly young users and dispelling the stuffy image of classical music.

The internet has also transformed ticketing. Booking a ticket has become possible from virtually anywhere, and it often allows a quicker and more convenient selection of seats. Even so, some teething problems remain: print@home tickets require scanner technology not every theatre can afford and the use of ticketing services, in Europe such as CTS Eventim, can increase prices.

Another popular tool is YouTube (for example the London Philharmonic Orchetra amongst many others) in particular. Orchestras reach out to audiences with an attractive age profile (mostly 13 to 35 years), increase the possibilities of direct communication as well as quantitative and qualitative audience research. Yet in Germany and many other central Euopean states hardly any orchestra fully utilises the potential of YouTube, typically offering only a small number of videos and neglecting feedback on user comments.

Detroit Symphony Orchestra reaches Three-Year-Contract-Agreement

Big deal in Detroit: Early, collaborative talks earn unprecedented resolution – 8 months prior to expiration of current contract.

 The Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) and its musicians announced the ratification of a new contract today, nearly eight months prior to the current contract’s expiration on Aug. 31, 2014. The new agreement resulted from a remarkably constructive series of as few as nine bargaining meetings, described by Joint Negotiations Committee members as “respectful,” “honest” and “transparent.”

DSO-Logo

A tentative agreement was reached late Monday evening, Jan. 6.  It was approved by the DSO Board of Directors on Monday, Jan. 13 and ratified by the musicians of the DSO today. The terms of the agreement fit within the parameters outlined in the DSO’s 10 year plan, Blueprint: 2023. This contract represents a turning point in the history of the DSO. The terms prioritize the DSO’s legacy of artistic excellence while continuing to position this organization at the forefront of innovation and accessibility. I want to extend my gratitude to the members of the board, orchestra and staff who led an extraordinarily thoughtful, thorough and constructive negotiations process.

This settlement is testament to the union of all stakeholders coming together to define our new reality while investing together in the future of the DSO and the renaissance of Detroit. This is yet another beacon of success sounding brightly from the Woodward corridor, among other triumphs including attendance records, a balanced budget, our passionate donor base and now this early contract settlement. All of this is made possible by joining together in our One DSO culture: a shared set of values inspiring us to steward the legacy of our beloved organization while innovating a brilliant future.

The agreement between the DSO and the members of Local 5 of the American Federation of Musicians will take effect Sept. 1, 2014 and extend through Aug. 31, 2017. The news comes after a period of negotiations that focused heavily on serving the DSO’s mission of embracing and inspiring individuals, families and communities through unsurpassed musical experiences. The musicians and management also worked collaboratively to reduce health care expenses, in the interest of fiscal responsibility. More concerts at Orchestra Hall, throughout Detroit and across Southeast Michigan will further promote one of the DSO’s chief values: accessibility.

Agreement at-a-glance

•             Contingent of 87, including 2 librarians

•             36 weeks of performances plus 4 weeks of vacation time

•             Total orchestra compensation, inclusive of salary and all benefits, fit within the parameters set forth in Blueprint 2023: over the life of the new contract, the total investment in the musicians of the DSO will increase 5.3 percent over the previous, three-year agreement

•             Most Accessible Orchestra on the Planet: The Integrated Media Agreement, which allowed the DSO to become the first orchestra in the world to offer a series of free live webcasts in 2011, will remain in force

•             Community Engagement Services: DSO musicians’ work at the DMC Children’s Hospital, senior living communities, schools and other community venues will continue through an extension of the “optional work” model provided for in the current contract

•             Neighborhood Residency Initiative: Seven neighborhood residencies established in Beverly Hills, Bloomfield Hills, Canton, Dearborn, Grosse Pointe, Southfield and West Bloomfield Township will continue to serve our patrons across metro Detroit with subscription concerts featuring specialized repertoire and intimate chamber recitals programmed by the musicians themselves

•             Special Events: The orchestra musicians have offered to donate 4 services per year in pursuit of high-profile, revenue-generating performance opportunities